Daily Mini Interview: Miniature 3D Printing by Lance Abernethy

Lance Abernethy’s 3D-Printed Works in Miniature

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Lance-2015-04-3D-printer-shoot-020Tell us a bit about the conception of The World’s Smallest Circular Saw

It was just a natural progression from the miniature drill. I like to make and create things. Using power tools and 3D printers help me bring those things to life.

There are lots of things that get me excited and when I see something or come up with an idea I just want to have a go. The idea stems from joining multiple interests together but turning them into something different.

Daily Mini Interview: Musée Miniature et Cinéma Director Dan Ohlmann

Musée Miniature et Cinéma Director Dan Ohlmann

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What are your earliest memories with miniatures?

Le dortoir de Dan Ohlmann CMJN
Le dortoir by Dan Ohlmann

As a child, I was very attracted to miniatures. I especially liked to create mini interiors of wooden huts, hunters’ homes with all their furniture and utensils. I was building works perched on real branches, and soon they became tropical forests. I built small streams that became big rivers. I was six years old and my pleasure was in search of maximum realism. I never put figures or figurines in my spaces because it totally interfered with my desire to create a “visual illusion.”

Daily Mini Interview: Paperholm by Charles Young

Paperholm Miniature Paper Sculptures

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How did the idea for Paperholm come about?

h_van_02_700The project came about as a way to keep myself making new work every day. Small paper models seemed like something that I could complete without it taking up too much time. The animations came about by chance really as I’d never made any before starting the project.

Do you save all the miniature paper sculptures you created?

Daily Mini Interview: Miniature Landscapes by Louise Smith

Miniature Embroidery by Louise Smith
Landscapes in Silk and Thread

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Tell us a bit about your background as an artist.

Free Bee 2 x 2 inchesAs a teenager, I saw an exhibition of free motion machine embroidery on silk, and was intrigued by how the stitched foreground appeared so near and the painted background so distant, making me feel I’d traveled miles while standing on the spot. But a little research on the subject—in books, in those pre-Internet days—left me feeling this was too tricky and time-consuming an art form to learn at the time.

Daily Mini Interview: The Museum of Working Miniatures

The Museum of Working Miniatures

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Describe your earliest memory with miniatures.

Screen Shot 2014-12-07 at 17.29.11Great question! I remember having a couple of working miniatures when I was a child. I still have a couple of them (a miniature board game and a Rubik’s cube-style puzzle.) But I didn’t follow up with a collection until much later in life.

Where did you come up with the idea for the Museum of Working Miniatures? 

The Museum of Working Miniatures YouTube Channel was established to showcase a unique collection of fully working miniature toys, games, electronics and gadgets.

Daily Mini Interview: Miracle Chicken Miniatures

Miracle Chicken Miniatures

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How did you first get started in miniatures?

2Loving all things miniature is my oldest memory. As a child I loved to draw and create things. So as I grew up, I discovered I could make my own dollhouse miniatures. I began carving animals from wood for a sculpture art project at the end of 12th grade. I hated that orange clay on my hands so I rummaged through a drawer in the art room and found an X-ACTO knife and some wood. I carved animals for my project and never looked back! My mother also loved miniatures and bought me every piece of 1964 Petite Princess furniture.

Daily Mini Interview: Studebaker Miniatures by Bill Studebaker

Studebaker Miniatures by Bill Studebaker

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What’s your earlier memory with miniatures?

Barbara and I had just gotten married. I overheard a conversation she had with her sister about the toys they used to play with when they were little. She never had a dollhouse. I thought, “that’s something I could do!” So I started building. I had no idea you could buy anything for a dollhouse, so I made everything from scratch. OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe more I worked on it, the more I fell in love with it. For Christmas, I presented my wife Barb with a box full of parts since the dollhouse would not be done in time. A time later, she bought a house kit while she was waiting for me to finish the dollhouse. In 2 years time, she had finished the kit and refurbished another one!

Daily Mini Interview: Miniatures by Fanni Sándor

FannimiNiATURE: Miniatures by Fanni Sándor

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How did you first get started in miniatures?

I have always loved miniature things since my childhood. I made my first dollhouse out of a shoe box when I was 7 years old. I first saw professional 1:12 scale miniatures 10 years ago on the Internet, and it was love at the first sight. In my country, this art form is totally unknown. il_fullxfull.762749966_8r2iSo after that, I started to try to make my own miniatures, and after a few years I became a professional miniaturist. I have been making miniature things since my childhood, but professional 1:12 scale miniatures now for around 5 years.

Daily Mini Interview: Fairchildart Miniatures

Fairchildart Miniatures

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How did you first get started in miniatures?

mc4I credit my mom as she’s always been an avid collector of miniatures. There’s something inherently magical about tiny replicas so real you’d think there was a shrink ray gun lying around.

How many years have you been making minis?

Since the summer of 2008.

What materials do you use to make your miniature food?

Sculpey and Fimo brands of polymer clay. Since I stick to mostly food, my collection of pastel squares has come incredibly handing for blushing fruit and “toasting” pastries.